Official page of the Institute of the Incarnate Word in the USA, Canada, Mexico, & Guyana


About Us

The Institute of the Incarnate Word was the first branch of the Religious Family of the Incarnate Word to be founded by Fr. Carlos Miguel Buela in 1984.

The Institute which draws its spirituality from the mystery of the Incarnation, was founded on the Solemnity of the Annunication, March 25th, 1984 in San Rafael, Argentina. A few years later Fr. Buela would also found a female branch the Servants of the Lord and the Virgin of Matará (SSVM), and a secular Third Order.

By means of the profession of the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, we want to imitate and follow more closely the Incarnate Word in his chastity, poverty and obedience. In addition, we profess a fourth vow of Marian slavery, according to the spirit of St. Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort. By means of this vow, we consecrate our whole lives to the Blessed Virgin Mary.

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  • Provincial News

    • The Gift of Life and Youth Celebrated in DC

      The Institute of the Incarnate Word (IVE) supporting pro-life movement at the Washington, D.C. 45th Annual Pro-Life March
      The Institute of the Incarante Word (IVE) make their presence at the 45th Annual Pro-Life March in Washington, D.C.

      January 22, 2018

      As I sit down to write this chronicle it’s Monday afternoon, January 22nd, the 45th Anniversary of the infamous Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that brought infamy to our nation: the “right” to abortion. That means it’s “March for Life Weekend” minus one. Echoes of “Ole, ole, ole, Pro-Life, ole!” still resound in my ears. Images of crowds, whether they be filling the National Basilica for the Vigil Mass for Life or marching down Constitution Ave towards the Supreme Court Building or packing the parish hall at St. John Baptist de la Salle for the Winter Youth Festival, flash through my memory. And still today, that strange “Indian summer”[1] as some call it around here in Washington, DC, lingers in the air. It’s the day after March for Life Weekend here at the seminary, and oh, what a weekend it was!

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    • Reception of Minor Orders

      Institute of the Incarnate Word (IVE) - Institution of Ministries at the Ven. Fulton Sheen House of Formation
      His Excellency, Bishop Barry Knestout, who was recently appointed as the 13th Bishop of the Diocese of Richmond, conferres the ministries of Acolyte and Reader on nine IVE seminarians at the Ven. Fulton Sheen House of Formation.

      On December 12th, 1531, the Blessed Virgin Mary, under the title of Our Lady of Guadalupe, desired to make herself known to the people of Mexico. She appeared to St. Juan Diego, whom she called her “dear little son”. In 1999, Saint John Paul the Great declared Our Lady of Guadalupe to be the patroness of the entire American Continent. This year, on the occasion of such an important Marian Feast Day, the Venerable Fulton Sheen House of Formation celebrated the conferral of minor orders.

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    • "The Habit is a sign of Consecration"

      Institute of the Incarnate Word (IVE) - Four IVE seminarians professed evangelical vows, 18 others renewed vows and 12 novices received their religious habit.
      Four IVE seminarians professed Evangelical vows of poverty chastity and obedience. (left to right: Jose Aca, Aaron Boutross, Simon Magaña, Andy Barth)

      “The habit is a sign of consecration, poverty and membership in a particular Religious family.”

      On the same day the universal Church celebrated the feast day of St. Andrew the Apostle, 4 IVE seminarians from the Province of the Immaculate Conception solemnly professed their first vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. Also included in the Mass, 12 novices received their new habits and 18 seminarians renewed their profession of vows.

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    The history of the devotion to Our Lady of Lujan began in 1630 when an immigrant farmer from Portugal decided to build a chapel on his newly acquired land in Argentina. He wrote to a friend in Brazil requesting that he send a small statue of Our Lady for his chapel. The friend responded by sending two statues: one of Mary, Mother of God, and one of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception.

    After their safe sea crossing, the statues were then placed on a cart in Buenos Aires to make their journey inland. When the transport caravan arrived at the Lujan River, however, something strange took place: the ox-pulled cart carrying the images of Our Lady would not budge. All efforts to move the cart were unsuccessful until the image of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception was unloaded. As soon as the image was off the cart, with the other image remaining inside, the cart proceeded to be pulled with ease.

    The statue of the Immaculate Conception, enrobed in an ornate blue-and-white dress and crowned as Queen, was then enthroned in a small wayside chapel where Mary had chosen to remain. She would henceforth be known as Our Lady of Lujan, "the Woman who waits," eventually becoming the most venerated image in all the region.

    This miraculous image of Mary, the woman who could not be moved, reveals the mystery of the same Mother who remains fixed at the foot of the Cross. Wherever the Cross of Christ is, Mary is present. Standing immobile beneath the Cross, she is able to travel to every place where the Cross of her Son is proclaimed.

    As patroness of the missionaries of the Religious Family of the Incarnate Word, Our Lady of Lujan continues to journey to foreign lands, attracting the hearts of all men and encouraging them to accompany her at the foot of the Cross, the instrument of Redemption and sign of evangelization.

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